ISLAND CREATION

National dredging policy indicates the nutrient-loaded sediment on the lakebed can be stored and separated via island containment areas. While the sediment doesn’t contain industrial pollutants, containment areas will help ensure nutrient-loaded sediment doesn’t leach back into the water column.

WHY ISLAND CREATION

Creating islands within Utah Lake will store and separate nutrient-loaded sediment and silts that are easily re-suspended into the water column. By storing sediments in islands containment areas, we will increase lake depth and reduce the force of waves on the lakebed and shoreline.

THREE TYPES OF ISLANDS

The Utah Lake Restoration Project will create three types of islands: estuary, recreation, and community. Each will play a specific role in the restoration of the lake.

ESTUARY

Estuary islands, also known as barrier islands, will protect shorelines and create miles of healthy, sustainable wetlands. Estuary islands will also:

  • Create 18 miles of shoreline habitat for wildlife and plants.
  • Act as a barrier to wind and wave events and protect from annual spring ice floes.
  • Provide a place to re-establish shoreline plants.
  • Provide protected areas for fish and waterfowl to feed and nest.

RECREATION

Recreation islands will act as wind and wave breaks across the lake. These islands will create over a thousand acres of recreational space that will be easily accessible to the public. Recreation islands will also provide:

  • Protected bays and coves allowing boaters to safely enjoy the lake.
  • Docks and other locations for shoring boats, including sailboats, on each island.
  • Provide a place to re-establish shoreline plants.
  • Beaches and pavilions for day use, overnight campgrounds, and cabins to increase recreational opportunities.

COMMUNITY

These islands will be created to build lakefront, mixed-use community developments with an emphasis on environmental best practices. They will fund the restoration work. They will include:

  • Islands designed for living, working, and recreating in harmony with the surrounding watershed ecosystem.
  • Housing, business, commercial, and entertainment centers focused on community-centered living.
  • Infrastructure designed to provide environmentally conscious engineering and construction solutions.

BETTER FOR EVERYONE

These conservation actions will transform Utah Lake from a degraded, hyper-eutrophic lake with a suspended mud bottom to a clean water-state ideal for fish, wildlife, and recreation.

BENEFICIAL USE OF DREDGE MATERIALS

In collaboration with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) published the Beneficial Use Planning Manual, which explains that a significant portion of sediment dredged from U.S. waters is not contaminated and should be used beneficially.

Disclaimer: The numbers presented on this site are based on conceptual plans and preliminary modeling. Numbers are subject to change as additional data, engineering, modeling, and modifications to the plan result from the permitting process led by the US Army Corps of Engineers. 

The Utah Lake Restoration Project is aligned with national dredging policy both in restoring Utah Lake as the largest natural freshwater lake in Utah and providing beneficial and productive use of dredge material for “wetland creation, beach nourishment, and development projects” (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2015, p. 1-2; USEPA, 2007, p. 5-9).

DRIVEN BY SCIENCE.
POWERED BY PASSION.

We’re working with world-class scientists and engineers to save Utah Lake after more than 150 years of degradation. Our plans are informed by proven technology and data to ensure a responsible, sustainable path forward for the lake and surrounding area. Learn all about the partnerships, studies, and assessments that are driving this project from concept to reality.

LEARN MORE

CONTACT US

ADDRESS

3300 N Triumph Blvd, Suite 100, Lehi, 84043

OFFICE LINE

Thank you for your message. It has been sent.
There was an error trying to send your message. Please try again later.